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Be it.

As the web matures, readers are beginning to expect a greater level of quality in the content that they find online. Search engines are adapting to this shift too: Google’s latest “Hummingbird” algorithm places priority on the “why” of a search and not the “what”. Gone are the un-glory days of  “articles” (I use that term loosely) stuffed to the brim with keywords and SEO “optimization”. On the new web, successful content is personal, engaging and real.

With that in mind, I’ve come up with three tips that you can use to improve your work and shake the bad habits of inauthentic, generic writing.

1. Be and write like yourself

When you’re writing, it’s very easy to inadvertently copy the tone and style of other writers. I am especially guilty of this  – the subconscious mind has a powerful ability to shape and alter the way you use language and I find that many of us are natural mimics. When you’re writing your very first drafts, try to let your thoughts flow naturally. I find that dictation lets me be more spontaneous and creative than typing or writing with a pen or pencil. You can record using a smartphone’s “Notes” features, software like Dragon Naturally Speaking, a hand-held tape recorder or if you are using OS X “Mavericks”, the built-in dictation feature.

When it’s time to check your first draft, look at the writing with a critical eye. Are you copying something you’ve read before? Does your writing sound like the copy from a print advertisement or the voiceover on a TV commercial? If it does, rewrite it as if you are speaking to a friend or family member. Readers are looking for intimacy and authenticity, not fluff and spin.

2. Ask for help and critique from others

It’s very difficult to judge the impressions our writing gives. Our perception of the quality and clarity of our writing will always be colored by our own expectations and beliefs about our abilities. As I mentioned in the introduction we want to write content that’s written from a real, honest place. One of the best ways to judge the genuineness of your content is the critique and commentary of others – it’s not important that the person know you in real life and you may find it valuable to source critiques from people who don’t know you.  Be sure to ask them what impression they get from what you’ve written – does it sound like the work of a real person or a team of copyeditors?

3. Tell me how you really feel

As far as I know, search engines are not yet at the level of being able to gauge the emotional content of a piece of writing, but people are very sensitive to these aspects of the written word. It’s always a good idea to choose subjects that bring you real, honest joy, excitement or even frustration. Choosing topics that really grab you will result writing that’s dynamic, passionate and exciting to read.

Your readers will be looking for clues that help them assess your authority and knowledge but  they will also be able to pick up on your emotional response to the topic that you’ve chosen.

When we write with authenticity, we share our feelings both directly through the words that we choose and indirectly through our phrasing, sentence structure and grammatical quirks. Many of us default to writing in a formal style that deliberately conceals the author’s thoughts and feelings. I urge you to shake this habit, after all, if your readers wanted Wikipedia, that’s where they’d be.

If you feel your content lacks in authenticity or isn’t as genuine as it could be, try revising it to share more of your feelings and thoughts about the topic. Don’t pack your writing full of idle musing; think of the emotional content as a rich spice and insert it sparingly.

I hope these three tips help you to create more authentic, genuine and “real” content. You can use these concepts in new writing as well as old  – revise your work often as your skills improve and you will see your audience grow and your body of work will better show your abilities as a content creator.

In closing, I’ll leave you with my latest mantra: “If Content is King, Authenticity is Queen.” 

Photo Credit: poshdee via Compfight cc

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Imagine this: You’re working on a creative project. It’s not exactly easy going, but something is special is happening – you’re losing track of time, focusing and trying new things with the confidence of a seasoned pro. Good news – this creative state of mind is actually a learned skill that you can use and improve whenever you want. It’s what blogger Steve Pavlina calls a “flow state” – when creativity just happens. 

Here are a few simple rules that you can apply to your creative process to improve your confidence and do more and better work, whatever you try.

1. Set goals that make sense to you

We often look to what’s come before us when we set our goals. Instead, ask yourself “What do I want to achieve?” By setting goals that reflect who you are, you’ll be able to stop comparing your progress and start simply creating. Don’t feel like to succeed there is a right or a wrong way to do something. Art, writing and other forms of creativity are highly personal. When you’re truly interested in your goal, reaching it will be easier and more enjoyable.

2. Consider changing your setting

When you imagined yourself working effortlessly on a project earlier, did you see yourself in a quiet library, or a private office? Consider the space you work in, but be open-minded – This paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research showed that exposing subjects to “a moderate…level of ambient noise enhances performance on creative tasks” when compared to a quiet environment. You don’t have to leave the house, but try adjusting your environment when you’re sitting down to be creative. Light a candle or two, put on some music or let your favorite movie play in the background.

3. Use tools that suit you

If you loved to paint with a roller, why would you use a brush? If you wanted to enjoy yourself, you would choose the tool you liked and being efficient wouldn’t be as large a consideration.

An effortless creative process is unique to you, so try a few things and stick with what feels the most natural. You’ll work better and faster if you allow yourself to feel confident, not uncomfortable.

4. Dedicate your time to being creative

If you don’t start, you won’t ever finish. Even if you’re not a planning person, you’ll find that defining how you use the time allotted to you each day makes getting into a “groove” much easier. You don’t have to rush either. Remember, an hour of creativity could be one sitting or 4 short bursts of 15 minutes each. What matters is that you dedicate the time to being creative.

5. Gather your resources in advance

Having everything you expect you’ll need on hand before you begin will reduce friction and make creativity easier. If you’ll need books or articles, gather them up before you start. If you’re planning on using images, gather them up and put them in one place. Save all your links in one text document. If all you’ll use is your imagination, gather up the tools ahead of time, whether it’s a pencil and paper or just a cup of tea.

An earlier version of this post originally appeared on Squidoo HQ.